News archive 2009, Permanent Diaconate

Launch of the Permanent Diaconate in the Diocese of Kilmore

PRESS RELEASE
29 November 2009

Launch of the Permanent Diaconate in the Diocese of Kilmore

Bishop Leo O’Reilly launched the Permanent Diaconate in the Diocese of Kilmore at a special gathering in the Diocesan Pastoral Centre, Cavan, last Sunday afternoon, 29th November. The launch was attended by representatives from every Parish Pastoral Council in the diocese as well as the priests and representatives of the religious orders. The gathering was addressed by Bishop O’Reilly, Fr. Gabriel Kelly, the director of the Permanent Diaconate in Kilmore, Fr. Gearóid Dullea, co-ordinator of the formation programme for the Permanent Diaconate in Ireland, and by Rev. Roger Evans a Deacon from the Archdiocese of Southwark in England and his wife Mrs. Maureen Evans.

A permanent deacon is primarily involved in works of charity and service, in promoting awareness of the social teaching of the church and facilitating the development of lay ministry in the parish. Deacons are also able to proclaim the gospel and preach the homily at Sunday Mass, assist at the altar, perform baptisms, preside at weddings and funeral services and be involved in the ongoing evangelisation that is an essential element of parish life in modern Ireland.

Most deacons work in ordinary full-time jobs and they help the people and priests of the parish in their spare time. Those who wish to be deacons must be aged between 35 and 60 at the start of their programme of formation. The deacon must work as part of a team and acknowledge and respect the contribution of others from a position of equality. Deacons will be ordained to work alongside priests and lay ministers not to replace them.

Further information:
Fr. Gabriel Kelly, email: gbkelly@eircom.net, tel: (048)66348250

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